Graduate Positions 2020

The YorkU fire team has a number of currently advertised graduate positions where we are looking for strong graduate students with creativity and interest in fire related themes.

We are currently recruiting 3 masters students and 2 doctoral students. Both Domestic and International students are being considered and the positions are fully funded and connected to Industry.

Our top available positions are the following:

  • MASc advertIn the area of Structural Fire Engineering we are looking on an initial focus on developing performance-based approaches to optimize fire protection for the Canadian construction market. This exciting opportunity is a collaboration with Entuitive, a global engineering firm in Toronto Canada (see http://www.entuitive.com). Studies would commence mid-2020. This applied research design project will be a collaboration with Matthew Smith P.Eng with opportunities for industry internship and experience. Previous civil engineering education with Canadian engineering material standards (CSA A23, S16, and/or O86) will be considered an asset. The research is tailored for a student with a strong interest to become a consulting fire engineer in Toronto.

 

  • Model2In the area of Stadium Design for Fire, we are looking at a fire engineering research programme that hybrids all of fire safety engineering together as a proposed PhD project. The work would fall under a multi-collaborative team with industry partner Arup, a multi-national engineering firm. We would be considering the study of an innovative structural system for stadium design and adjoining fire behaviour and pedestrian dynamics. Previous fire engineering education with at least one of these topics of study will be considered an asset. The project is tailored for a student with a strong interest to become an academic/professor in Canada.

 

  • EJQ9lALXYAAcCcXOther topical areas for graduate project (Both MASc and PhD) consideration may include: How compartment (room) size effects the fire dynamics of Timber structures to enable the generation of engineered tool sets; climate effects and resiliency of timber building materials to extreme hazards ; and lastly we are looking for students with interest in heritage materials in fire. Those projects are sponsored by a variety of governmental collaborations and are meant to inform standards and code development cycles.

 

Each of the above projects will have options for industrial internship and/or opportunities to study abroad for a term of study with our collaborators.

Those interested in these opportunities are encouraged to email Dr. John Gales P.Eng (jgales@yorku.ca) with a statement of interest and CV.

About YorkU Fire

We are situated in Toronto,, at Canada’s third largest university. Home to the YorkU High bay lab, we have recently received CFI funding in order to expand our fire testing facilities (see https://yorkufire.com/2019/09/06/york-fire-lab-funding/). Our group uses some of the most advanced instrumentation technologies for strain and deformation measurement in fire. Our graduate team is currently 6 strong with an equal representation of undergraduate researchers. Graduate courses offered are Human Behaviour in Fire, Fire Dynamics, Structural Fire Resilience, and Fire Modelling.

York Fire Lab

Our fire lab funding was made official with a CFI-ORF grant this September. This funding advances equipment and technology for material study in fire and conducting data collection in HBIF studies with modern camera equipment. The grant will allow the fire testing lab at York University in Toronto, Canada to scale up fire testing technology. This tech will allow for testing using load and heat on realistic building frames to make buildings safer and more cost-efficient. A demonstration ‘blue-light’ fire test at York University was performed as part of the funding announcement by the government ministry. More Details here: https://news.ontario.ca/medg/en/2019/09/ontario-investing-in-research-to-strengthen-economy-and-create-jobs.html

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Evacuation Study of a Cultural Centre

abstracts1Our team’s recent human behaviour in fire research in collaboration with ARUP will be presented at Interflam in London, UK this July. Two of our multi-disciplinary papers represent an ongoing research project performed over the last three years: “Fire evacuation and strategies for cultural centres.” And “The effects of Linguistic Cues on Evacuation Movement Times”. In this research project we characterized three evacuations that occurred at a Cultural Centre over the course of three years. This project has been a major focus of our group for some time however one which requires significant consideration. We are now introducing the project to the fire community for the first time this summer for preliminary feedback as we continue to advance this very important project in the long term.

abstracts2Interflam is one of the leading fire conferences this year so the venue serves a great location. Part of our outputs are towards a comprehensive database of group based movement and decision making characteristics. We followed this with extensive surveying of linguistic evacuation cues at that centre conducted over several months to interrogate themes we observed. These results are being utilized to inform the development of evacuation modelling in our future work and collaborations.

Presentations of these papers will occur July 2nd, papers will be posted soon!

Heritage Materials in Fire

torontoAt York University, our fire research team studies heritage materials and their response to fire. Our focus has been to consider timber and masonry. Doing these studies we are in the midst of preparing revised international guidance for these important structures. More recently the events in Paris have emphasized why this is such a serious topic of research to consider. For the last two years we have focused our efforts to really understanding timber performance, and we have done this by procuring real materials (columns, beams etc) from structures undergoing renovation (adaptive re-use) or sadly demolition. The importance of this study is now even more profound given this weeks events.